Pay me: Some Thoughts on Musicians and Money.

F*ck you. Pay me: Some Thoughts on Musicians and Money.: “When she writes of ‘norms,’ she seems to imply (and here I also draw from my own experience), that money is something to be tip-toed around, that there are tacit rules that must be followed, that handshake deals are the norm, and that money somehow sullies the purity of art.

This needs to end. Now.”

The Photoshop of Sound – The New Yorker

The Photoshop of Sound – The New Yorker: “Joshua Gersen, who conducted that night, began the show with a demonstration of the Meyer setup. He clapped his hands; the sound resonated handsomely. Then he signalled for the power to be turned off. Suddenly, the clap was clipped and lifeless. The crowd gasped and applauded. The Meyers, sitting amid a throng of twenty- and thirty-somethings, smiled. ‘Isn’t that a kick?’ Helen said.”

All the ghostly sounds that are lost when you compress to mp3

All the ghostly sounds that are lost when you compress to mp3: “Right now, you’re probably listening to music on your computer. The source of that music — whether you’re listening to an mp3 file or streaming — is a compressed version of a file that was much more detailed, but way larger. It’s worth interrupting your music for a moment and asking: What sounds are you missing?

To get a sense, watch the video above, created by Ryan Maguire, a Ph.D. student in Composition and Computer Technologies at the University of Virginia Center for Computer Music, for a project called The Ghost In The Mp3. It’s a song made with only the sounds that were left out when compressing Suzanne Vega’s ‘Tom’s Diner’ to mp3.”

6 Audio Editing Tips for PreSonus Studio One : AskAudio Magazine

6 Audio Editing Tips for PreSonus Studio One : AskAudio Magazine: “Studio One has some real handy ways in which to edit and manipulate your audio. These methods can be useful in speeding up your workflow and in creating new audio ideas. Let’s take a look at some helpful audio tips that will improve your Studio One production techniques.”

‘Grammy U’ teaches young musicians at Loyola

On the night of the Grammy awards, WWL-TV did a nice story on Grammy U that features one of our faculty and a number of our students.

‘Grammy U’ teaches young musicians at Loyola: “Twenty Grammy nominees, in a variety of categories, have Louisiana ties this year. And at Loyola University, there’s a whole crop of young, new talent hoping to make in the music industry some day.”

Why CDs May Actually Sound Better Than Vinyl – Los Angeles | Los Angeles News and Events | LA Weekly

Why CDs May Actually Sound Better Than Vinyl – Los Angeles | Los Angeles News and Events | LA Weekly: “”

Russell wasn’t trying to make recorded music more convenient or portable. He was trying to make it more accurate, a clearer reflection of the performance. “I wanted the symphony to sound like the symphony,” he says.

How speakers make sound – Animagraffs

How speakers make sound – Animagraffs: “Speakers (also called loudspeakers) push and pull surrounding air molecules in waves that the human ear interprets as sound. You could even say that hearing is movement detection. So what makes a speaker travel back and forth at just the right rate and distance, and how does that make sound?”

(Via https://www.facebook.com/groups/heyaudiostudent/.)

The Guitarists’ Guide to Writing Charts | 2014-11-28 | Premier Guitar

A great look at real world notational situations from Shane Theriot.

The Guitarists’ Guide to Writing Charts | 2014-11-28 | Premier Guitar:

“Throughout my career as a guitarist, I’ve received plenty of last-minute calls to cover a gig or session. I’ve heard everything from ‘Can you cover this session for me on Friday?’ to ‘Can you fly to Los Angeles and do the Jay Leno show on Friday?’ Such calls usually come a day or two beforehand.

Dealing with this kind of pressure is part of being a professional guitarist. If you’re going to accept the gig, then you have to be able to deliver. As a result of these calls I’ve grown musically and I’m used to virtually any type of situation. One way I’ve been able to pull it off is by using charts and cheat sheets to learn lots of material in a short time.

I’m currently working as the guitarist and musical director on the TV show Live from Daryl’s House. This means not only must I learn the songs for all the various artists, but I’m also responsible for writing charts and arrangements for the other guys in the band, doing the occasional horn arrangements, and creating lyric and chord charts for Daryl Hall and often the artists themselves. In this lesson, I’d like to share how I use charts and musical ‘shorthand’ in real-life situations to get me through some of these last-minute calls.”